Hit Tracker is now ESPN Home Run Tracker! Hit Tracker founder Greg Rybarczyk is now collaborating with the ESPN Stats & Information Group to continue tracking all MLB home runs, and helping baseball fans know "How Far It Really Went!™" Please credit any information on this site to ESPN Stats & Information Group. For more information and analysis on home runs, please contact founder Greg Rybarczyk. E-Mail ESPN Home Run Tracker
Main Page | Ballparks | Park Overlays | Glossary | Highlight Homers | Feedback | Bio | 3 Types of HR's | AAA Home Run Derby Last Updated: August 19, 2014, 11:19 pm PST
Welcome to the ESPN Home Run Tracker! Check out the ESPN MLB Scoreboard throughout the 2014 season! Contact us at grybar@hittrackeronline.com.

Glossary of Hit Tracker Terms

 
True Dist. (True Distance, a.k.a. Actual Distance) - If the home run flew uninterrupted all the way back to field level, the actual distance the ball traveled from home plate, in feet. If the ball's flight was interrupted before returning all the way down to field level (as is usually the case), the estimated distance the ball would have traveled if its flight had continued uninterrupted all the way down to field level.
Std Distance (Standard Distance) - The estimated distance in feet the home run would have traveled if it flew uninterrupted all the way down to field level, and if the home run had been hit with no wind, in 70 degree air at sea level. Standard distance factors out the influence of wind, temperature and altitude, and is thus the best way of comparing home runs hit under a variety of different conditions.
Speed Off Bat - The calculated speed of the baseball as it left the bat, in miles per hour (mph).
Elev. Angle - the angle above horizontal at which the ball left the bat, in degrees. Typically between 25 and 45 degrees for home runs.
Horiz. Angle - the initial direction of the ball as it left the bat in degrees, where 45 degrees is straight down the right field line, 90 degrees is straight over second base and 135 degrees is straight down the left field line.
Apex - the highest point reached by the ball in flight above field level, in feet.
Impact Due To Wind - the distance gained or lost due to the impact of the wind on the ball in flight, in feet. Distance lost to the wind is listed as a negative number, while distance gained from the wind is listed as a positive number.
Impact Due To Temperature - the distance gained or lost due to the impact of the ambient temperature, in feet, as compared to a "standard" temperature of 70 degrees. Distance lost to the increased resistance of cooler, more dense air is listed as a negative number, while distance gained from the decreased resistance of warmer, less dense air is listed as a positive number.
Impact Due To Altitude - the distance gained or lost due to the impact of the ballpark altitude, in feet, as compared to a "standard" altitude of zero feet (sea level). Currently, there are no ballparks located below sea level, so there are no negative numbers; distance gained from the decreased resistance of the less dense air at higher altitudes is listed as a positive number.
"Just Enough" home run - Means the ball cleared the fence by less than 10 vertical feet, OR that it landed less than one fence height past the fence. These are the ones that barely made it over the fence.
"No Doubt" home run - Means the ball cleared the fence by at least 20 vertical feet AND landed at least 50 feet past the fence. These are the really deep blasts.
"Plenty" home run - Everything else, except for the 2 above Homerun types
Lucky Homer - A home run that would not have cleared the fence if it has been struck on a 70-degree, calm day.
# Parks - This value indicates the number of MLB ballparks, out of 30, in which the ball in question would have been a home run, if the ball had been struck in weather conditions of 70 degrees and no wind. Really long home runs could achieve a value of 30, while a particularly weak home run could achieve a value as low as zero if it only made it over the fence in the park in which it was struck due to "help" from wind and/or temperature. The average value for "# Parks" in 2011 was about 23.


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